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and your point . . . ?

The sixth edition of and your point . . . ? is designed to meet course content and standards for first-semester freshman composition and rhetoric students at community colleges as well as four-year colleges and universities.

Using the cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary pieces in this text, students are asked to use their critical reading and thinking skills to examine their understanding of and use of language to explore concepts across the academic curriculum, i.e., the natural sciences, the liberal arts, the social sciences.

The readings in this edition of . . . and your point? were selected to emphasize critical reading and thinking across a number of academic disciplines.

We used a number of criteria in choosing the readings:

  • concepts, such as Darwinism, Marxism or emancipation, that will challenge our students to think critically;

  • a level of language that demands close reading, and re-reading, to achieve understanding;

  • content that reflects thinking and writing across a range of academic disciplines, including the natural sciences, sociology, anthropology, music, painting, history, philosophy, religion, literature, economics.

  • connections between/among readings to encourage the students to explore relationships and understand different facets of complex issues, and

  • non-textual materials, such as charts, tables, graphs, cartoons, and fine art, requiring students to be able to interpret them and relate them to text.



PART ONE
WRITING: PROCESS AND PRODUCT

WHY WE WRITE
THE ESSAY
PURPOSE, AUDIENCE TONE AND LEVEL OF LANGUAGE
READING
    Annotating the Text
    Reading Critically
THE WRITING PROCESS
    The Writing Cycle
    Prewriting
      Freewriting
      Brainstorming
      The Six Questions
      Mapping

    Organizing
      Informal Outlining
      Formal Outlining

    Drafting
      Some Tips about Drafting
    Revising
    Editing/Proofreading
      Checklist
AN OVERVIEW OF THE WRITING PROCESS
THE PARARAPH
ORGANIZATION
THE INTRODUCTION
    The “Grabber” Opening
      Personal Narrative
      Quotation
      Current Event
      Fact/Statistic
      Interesting Question

    Thesis Statement
    Some Myths about Thesis Statements
    Some Dos and Don’ts for Introductions
BODY
CONCLUSION
    Some Dos and Don’ts for Conclusions
LANGUAGE
    Being Specific
    Connotation and Denotation
RHETORICAL MODES
    DESCRIPTION
    NARRATION
    EXAMPLES/ILLUSTRATION
    COMPARE AND CONTRAST
    CAUSE AND EFFECT
    ARGUMENTATION
      Premises and Conclusions
      Logical Fallacies
      Organization
      The Thesis
      Conclusion

SUMMARY WRITING
WRITING AN ESSAY EXAMINATION

PART TWO
READINGS


PART THREE
GRAMMAR AND MECHANICS
    Parts of Speech
    Subjects and Verbs
    Phrases and Clauses
    Sentences


PART FOUR
IMPROVING SENTENCES
    Eliminating Sentence Fragments
    Avoiding Run-on Sentences and Comma Splices
    Using Verbs
    Appropriate Use of Pronouns
    Using Modifiers
    Keeping Elements Parallel
    Using Adjectives and Adverbs


PART FIVE
PUNCTUATION
    Commas
    Semicolons
    Quotation Marks
    Quotation Marks/Italics
    Apostrophes
    Colons
    Dashes
    Hyphens/Parentheses/Brackets/Ellipses/Slashes

PART SIX
USAGE

INDEX